Slice Harvester Issue 6 “The Villages” 

Came across Colin’s review of the two pizza places by my old middle school. I finished many homework assignments during my lunch period, sitting at the window high chair at Vinny Vincez. There were grease stains on so many of those pages. The painting of the mobsters riding the 1 train was always a nice touch too. Found memories of that place. Plus the actual pizza was great — they used to have a deal, two slices and a soda for $4. Not sure if that exists anymore. 

Slice Harvester correspondent Cory Feierman — record store manager, dream-babe rock’n’roller, pizza lover, punk rocker — has long mentioned to me that he is pretty into the slice at Vinny Vincenz, although last Thursday when we went by Academy to say hello to him, he was quick to mention that the slice there is usually hit or miss. Luckily for Matthew, Noah and I, our slice last week was a huge hit. 

This slice was well cooked and had great ratios. It was a noisy slice. It snapped and cracked when bitten or folded, but it wasn’t brittle, just delicately crisp. It had good cheese and excellent charred flavor, though it was a tad on the small side. Matthew said, “the thinness of the crust demonstrates a measured skill, “and I couldn’t agree more. But heed the words of Cory, apparently we were lucky and this slice is usually all over the map.”

Johny’s Pizza and Pasta was always whack. That review was spot on. I never knew why kids wouldn’t just walk the extra block for a decent slice. 

"And I’m sure my (currently non-existent) newphews and nieces or my newphews’ and nieces’ newphews and nieces will look at some of the yuppie shithole pizzerias that i hate the decor of and they will have seen them since they were little kids and they will have an affinity for that stuff and whatever the spaceage new shit that comes out when they are teenagers will be stupid to them or whatever, but it’s actually, ultimately all the same crap. And this pizza is also the same crap."

distortjerseycity:

#newyorksalright (at Washington Square Park)

distortjerseycity:

#newyorksalright (at Washington Square Park)

Radio
Rancid

Rancid - Radio

When I Got The Music, I Got A Place To Go 

distortjerseycity:

La Misma #distortjerseycity #wfmu (at WFMU)

distortjerseycity:

La Misma #distortjerseycity #wfmu (at WFMU)

gollygumdrops:

Tonight my friends are opening for I Am the Avalanche, Turnover, and The Swellers at the Loft in Poughkeepsie! So proud!

kayywizz:

teeth dreams on repeat

The Front Bottoms, a live performance of an early version of The Beers from room C-111 (Ramapo College?) 

Jumping from TFB link to link and found this hiding out on a facebook event page for a house show in Virginia that they played in 2011 on their tour with Emperor X. 

This is what brunchin’ looks like

This is what brunchin’ looks like

lizpelly:

i think “embarrassingly sincere” is one of my favorite genres of human

"In an era defined by the Seattle grind and gloom of Nirvana and Alice in Chains, songs like Armstrong’s teenage-runaway memoir, "Welcome to Paradise," and the jubilantly vengeful "Having a Blast" combined classic-punk minimalism, Sixties pop pow and unflinching introspection, forged in the outsider ideals of the East Bay underground. Armstrong and Dirnt, childhood friends who began playing music together when they were 12, named Green Day after their fondness for spending days just sitting around smoking weed. "Dookie" was a tour van euphemism for diarrhea brought on by bad road chow; when asked about the name of the album, Armstrong replies, "It was a stoner thing."

Feature story and six page spread on the making of Green Day’s “Dookie,” which turned 20 earlier this year, in this month’s issue of Rolling Stone. The story begins with a scene from their record release show at a club in San Fransisco, where the Dead Milkmen opened, and the bananas video for “Welcome to Paradise” was shot:

"At Slim’s, Green Day tore through the new songs with lunatic glee. The 500-person crowd’s reaction was immediate and a little scary, an unhinged euphoria of crowd-surfing and slam-dancing caught in a video for the single "Welcome to Paradise," shot at the club that night. "People were genuinely bursting with energy," Armstrong, now 42, recalls, "as if they wanted to be part of something but nobody knew what it was. We didn’t either.""

yelahhaley:

Tigers Jaw covering Brand New’s “Moshi Moshi.” 

Hostile, Mass.
The Hold Steady

just-kind-of-floating:

"They met as kids he was angry and angsty
Yeah, she was a damned good dancer
I’ll be damned if they didn’t disappear
Wandered out of mass one day and faded into the fog and love and faithless fear.”

just-kind-of-floating:

Attention Matt and JP!



New album art! This is perfect. Does this girl wanna join the band?

just-kind-of-floating:

Attention Matt and JP!

New album art! This is perfect. Does this girl wanna join the band?